PTSD Awareness : Combat Injured Troops

In honor of June being PTSD Awareness Month, we at The Life Chest want to call attention to some of the issues our American soldiers face as the realities of combat. The statistics are jarring, but we believe that there is power in being informed, and understand that there are many who are unaware of the spectrum of problems that may follow our troops home.

For every US soldier killed in World Wars I and II, there were 1.7 soldiers wounded. In Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, for every US soldier killed, seven were wounded. Combined, over 48,000 servicemen and women have been physically injured in the recent military conflicts.

In addition to physical wounds, it’s estimated as many as 400,000 service members live with invisible wounds of war, including combat-related stress, major depression, and PTSD. Another 320,000 are believed to have experienced a traumatic brain injury while deployed.

PTSD is claiming the lives of 22 veterans PER DAY. The numbers continue to rise and we must remember that without our veterans we would not have the freedoms that have become the norm of our everyday lives.



22 a Day – An Image from Combat Injured Troops

22 a Day – An Image from Combat Injured Troops

Transitioning back into “normal” life can be difficult for veterans upon arriving home, and that transition may prove to be even tougher for those injured in combat or dealing with PTSD. Luckily, there are many charities and organizations who strive to make a difference in these wounded veteran’s lives.

One such organization is the All Veteran Group. They are focused on representing military veterans through parachute demonstrations, tandem parachute experiences, brand ambassador programs, sponsorships & special events. They have a program called Therapy in the Air, where combat-injured troops have the opportunity to skydive with the All Veteran Group founder, Mike Elliott. Therapy in the Air is both therapeutic and rewarding to veterans. The All Veteran Group’s Therapy in the Air skydiving program “… helps warriors thrive through post-traumatic growth (PTG)…  [It] inspires individuals during rehabilitation, reintegration and during the healing process.”

The All Veteran Group

The All Veteran Group

One such positively impacted combat-injured veteran is Todd Love, a testament to both the power of the human spirit as well as the impact that Therapy in the Air produces.Todd Love was a U.S. Marine, and was injured in an IED explosion while he was deployed in Afghanistan. As a triple amputee, Todd dreamed of being able to skydive with Mike Elliott; however, his doctors told him it wasn’t a possibility. With the help and training of Mike Elliott, the invention of a special tandem harness, and the joy of the jump, Todd proved them wrong. Todd has completed over 200 skydives with Mike Elliott to date, and the happiness it brings him is incredible.

Mike Elliott and Todd Love

Mike Elliott and Todd Love

Todd Love is a USMC veteran who lost both of his legs and his left hand to an IED in Afghanistan, who's determined to not let that get in the way of ANYTHING (Watch Todd's story: http://vimeo.com/23424390). He has been surfing, skiing, scuba diving, wrestling alligators, and now learning to skydive.

The Life Chest is currently holding a CrowdRise campaign in order to raise money to donate Life Chests to combat-injured veterans. Life Chests serve to provide a special place for those who have served or are currently serving in the military to keep their most treasured mementos and keepsakes. By having their very own Life Chest, they will have the opportunity to constantly be reminded of major milestones, and intimate memories. With the help of your donations, after the combat-injured solders complete their skydive with Mike Elliott through Therapy in the Air, they will be presented a Life Chest.

Save a life and leave a legacy… Please donate today to The Life Chest and give our incredible veterans something special. Visit our CrowdRise page at CrowdRise.com/LeaveaLegacy and make a difference!